Advocating for Apprentices

MGS Technical Plastics was part of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders delegation which also included industry giants such as BMW and Nissan.

We are a vocal advocate of the apprenticeship scheme: each of its directors began their careers as apprentices and MGS recruited six new apprentices over the last 18 months.

At the House of Lords, the event showcased apprenticeships of all disciplines from across the automotive industry with apprentices speaking about their experiences to an audience of manufacturers, supply chain companies and MPs.

The reception highlighted how hands-on training can be combined with classroom learning to help young people find high quality jobs while fulfilling the needs of British businesses.

The delegation also discussed how apprentices of different types are employed throughout the supply chain, and in companies of all sizes, while sharing advice and best practice tips.

Mark Preston, of MGS Technical Plastics, said: “Industries such as ours require specialised skills and apprentices are the best way to fill that need. We all need to inspire young people to consider it as a career path and to promote the manufacturing and automotive industries as exciting and attractive options.

“We need to show them what we do, the technical skills we develop, the innovation we strive for, the responsibility we carry economically and environmentally and of course show them what’s possible in terms of career advancement.”

Mark added: “For MGS, it is an honour to be invited as part of the SMMT delegation. We aren’t the largest company by size but it is clear that we do have significant influence. We are on the SMMT Regional Engagement board for the North and are the only plastic injection moulding company on this board, and to be invited to this event along with BMW, Nissan and McLaren shows that we are held in high regard.”

The apprentices who have joined MGS in the last 18 months range from school-leavers beginning their careers through to managers looking to boost their skills sets. They are: Lee Smith, Technician Apprentice; Steven Hyde, Tool Room Apprentice; Dillon Tennant, Electro Mechanical Engineer Apprentice; Simon Glasson, Leadership Apprenticeship; Glenn Miller, Leadership Apprenticeship; and Mark Hartley, Technician Apprentice.

Apprentices keep the UK competitive, says award-winning MGS Technical Plastics

This week is the 12th annual National Apprenticeship Week, a week-long, country-wide celebration of apprenticeships. And here at MGS, we believe there is a lot to celebrate.

Following the appointment of six new apprentices over the last 18 months, they now account for more than 10 per cent of our total workforce.

And that’s not forgetting that each of our directors began their careers on apprenticeship programmes.

Ask Neil Garrity, our Operations Director, and he’ll tell you that not only are apprentices the key to our success, but they’re crucial to keeping Britain competitive in a global marketplace.

“Apprenticeships are absolutely critical to the future of the engineering industry,” says Neil.

“The programme allows firms like ours to shape the next generation of workers in terms of skills and attitudes, while the apprentices earn a professional qualification and benefit from on-the-job, hands-on training.

“But while employing apprentices has been fantastic for our business. I think some of our peers worry that an individual may walk away once they have completed their training. Despite this small risk, our apprenticeship programme has paid for itself ten times over.”

Neil says: “Employers who choose not to invest in apprentices are being left behind. They struggle to source the skills they need while forward-thinking companies like ours design bespoke programmes for the specific work we undertake, creating our dream workforce.

“Our apprentices get the experience on the job and can really gain in skills and confidence. Both our staff and our company can progress. It’s a win-win situation.”

The apprentices who have joined MGS in the last 18 months range from school-leavers beginning their careers through to supervisors looking to boost their skills sets.

They are: Lee Smith, Technician Apprentice; Steven Hyde, Toolroom Apprentice; Dillon Tennant, Electro Mechanical Engineer Apprentice; Simon Glasson, Leadership Apprenticeship; Glenn Miller, Leadership Apprenticeship; and Mark Hartley, Technician Apprentice.

Training 2000 Representative with the two mgs apprentices sat around a table

MGS appoints Three New Apprentices

Blackburn-based MGS Technical Plastics is investing in the future with the appointment of three new apprentices. Manufacturing director Neil Garrity says that training young adults is not only essential for the UK to continue its manufacturing excellence, but that MGS’s apprenticeship programme has paid for itself ten times over.

The three apprentices at the injection moulding specialist are: Steven Hyde, toolroom trainee; Dillon Tennant, electrician apprentice; and Michael Critchley, trainee technician. As well as learning their job by getting hands-on at MGS, Steven and Dillon will also study for Level 3 Diplomas in Advanced Manufacturing Engineering with the College of West Anglia, which offers specialist injection moulding machine related courses, in partnership with Training 2000, based in MGS’s hometown. Michael will soon begin onsite training with Solution 4 Polymers in partnership with College of West Anglia.

The new trio takes the number of apprentices trained by MGS to six in the last five years, as the growing company aims to reach £10m annual turnover. Following a multimillion relocation to its current headquarters in the last decade, the firm has invested an additional £2m on property, machinery, staff and training.

Neil Garrity said: “Apprenticeships have proven to be very valuable to the individual, us as an employer, and the manufacturing industry as a whole. It is a great way to find and develop the fresh talent that our sector so badly needs.”

Neil says that a lack of companies offering apprenticeships over the last two decades has left the UK short on skilled workers, which could eventually hurt the country’s position as a world-leader in the field. And he says there is a very strong business case for employers to make the most of apprenticeship schemes.

Neil added: “There is always the risk that you train an individual who then goes on to work for another business, but despite that our apprenticeship programme has paid for itself ten times over. “Businesses that don’t take on apprentices are the dinosaurs of the sector and are hurting their own prospects as well as the industry as a whole.”

“Apprenticeships are also a great proposition for our trainees,” he said. “We give individuals a chance to shine, and the ones who show initiative get plenty of opportunities to develop their careers.”

Written by Amanda Jackson, TigerFish PR

http://www.tigerfishpr.co.uk/

Employees at training

Recent training and its role at MGS

This past month has involved a lot of training for Employees, which is usual for MGS. However, this time there was more of a focus on developing towards our Quality Standards. Our first lot of training focused on IATF 16949 Internal Audit training. This involved our employees completing a 2-day course to ensure we are IATF ready throughout the year. The second involved a team learning more about HACCP and Hazard and Risk Management for a day and the second day for Internal Audit Training. Both days in preparation for a BRC audit to become accredited in a couple of months. Overall, our employees gained 15 more certificates at the completion of this training.

Training at MGS

It can be easily said training is a very important aspect at MGS; we want our employees to have the knowledge that will allow them to excel in their job role. The opportunities we provide our employees will allow us to reap the rewards in the future. We already have a vast number of employees currently in further education, involved in college courses, training days and apprenticeships to name a few. This means there is always a range of training available for employees to take advantage of throughout the year. Also, being in the manufacturing industry and the looming skill gap, we want to ensure we can develop and retain the skills we need to succeed and grow. We see the developments we are making as a long term investment in our employees and for ourselves.

A quote to remember:

‘What if we train them and they leave? What if we don’t and they stay?’